Willy loman succumbs to the pressures of society

As a salesman, Willy developed many hindrances that caused his mind to deteriorate. Yet, Willy was already down, and society kept him there. Many feel pity towards Willy Willy loman succumbs to the pressures of society, why.

He never bothered to try to be happy with what he had, he just tried to get more things to make him feel happy. He wanted success and money, but at the age of sixty-one, he realized that these goals would never be reached.

His life, one that was spent trying to become another person, namely Dave Singleman, was a waste as no-one even wanted to see him buried. And for a man who cannot sell well, the loss of a salary is very detrimental to his well-being. His life as a salesman was built on a dream that he witnessed as a child.

He died for things that he had lived for- his sons and illusions of prosperity. And how about this shadowy backdrop image and a red checkered floor.

Willy cheated on his wife, was caught by his son, who never fully recovered from the shock yet still loved him dearly, and Willy was never willing to step up and take account for his faults. Willy Loman died still unsure of his status in the business world.

More modern sets may be used to show that this need not be an historical piece.

Willy Loman: Illogical Dream of being the Greatest Salesman ever

As a salesman, Willy developed many hindrances that caused his mind to deteriorate. During the funeral of his father, Biff decides that he will not allow that to happen to himself.

Willy Loman: Illogical Dream of being the Greatest Salesman ever

Many Americans could not subscribe to the level of social conformity and the ideological and cultural orthodoxy that a prosperous, booming, conservative suburban middle- class championed.

However, he is a father and husband, and evidently the head of the family. Willy has a war going on in his mind, and he is helpless toward ending it.

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It seems that the regular employee is not noticed as much, and that the company as a whole is what is more often seen. In search of happiness, Willy believed that he could give his family what they wanted if he only left the world. He met a woman who would be very cheap for an evening, and as a boost of confidence, Willy spent the night with this low-class woman.

Society added fuel to the fire by not accepting him either. Thinking of himself and his son Biff who had potential, but did not take advantage of it. It may be that Miller wanted to clarify the definition: Sharma, critical analysis Willy's life would have been more satisfying had he engaged himself in more physical work that would occupy his mind.

He did not have friends and people did not like him in New England. Willy Loman was influenced by society in that he could not overcome the pressures of selling and making money. He had the determination to become a great football player, not to mention make something with his life and the Loman name.

Is Willy Loman A Tragic Hero

At his funeral, Willy only notices salesman and buyers and not any friends and family. To the protagonist of Death of a Salesman, the American Dream is the ability to become prosperous by mere charisma. What appeared, instead, was the belief that his father was a loser with no potential to ever support his family.

And as he explained often, "I have friends This inability to cope with the real world eventually leads to his death. His life, one that was spent trying to become another person, namely Dave Singleman, was a waste as no-one even wanted to see him buried.

It is his inability to see past the materialistic side of his American dream that leads him to his destructive action, his inability to remember the preciousness of life. In reflection of his career with the Wagner Company, many other problems arose that forced economic difficulties on him and his family.

And this leads him into an alienation from himself, obscuring his real identity. This was shown through both Biff and Willy. Willy Loman wants to be the best at anything, particularly selling and being a provider for his family. This seminar research paper is an attempt to reconstruct and analyze the American Dream in contrast to that presented in the play.

What is the impact of Willy Loman's ambition on himself and others in Death of a Salesman? 1 educator answer In Death of a Salesman, explain why Willy Loman's motivations are nonsense. The pressures of society killed a man who once had courage and determination.

But, as his life moved further, Willy Loman lost his ability to see the world clearly. All. Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” puts the titular salesman, Willy Loman, at odds against his own psychological decline due to the pressures of society and his own personal failures as a salesman.

Society, in this case, rejects Willy Loman because he isn't upper class, and because he is getting up in age. Many occurrances highlight society's judging of Willy, including him being fired, the "spite" that he recieves from his sons, and the way he alienates himself.

Willy Loman died still unsure of his status in the business world. He. wanted success and money, but at the age of sixty-one, he realized that these.

goals would never be reached. His identity was lost and his presence on earth. unknown. Willy Loman was influenced by society in that he could not overcome.

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the pressures of selling and making money.3/5(1). Willy Loman: Illogical Dream of A common idea presented in literature is the issue of the freedom of the individual in opposition to the controlling pressures of society.

Willy loman succumbs to the pressures of society
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