The allegory of the wizard of oz by frank baum

The Tin Man — the American industrial worker, who had been exploited and treated like just another piece of machinery by rich and powerful employers.

The Wicked Witch of the East — a stand-in for Wall Street financiers, eastern elite big businessmen, and Washington politicians.

My friends, we have made no criticism. On the surface, this verdict is confirmed by Ranjit S.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Monetary Reformer’s Brief Symbol Glossary

At the send-off, he appoints the Scarecrow to rule in his stead, which he agrees to do after Dorothy returns to Kansas. In itself, however, this discovery proves nothing. This grim depiction reflects the forlorn condition of Kansas in the late s and early s, when a combination of scorching droughts, severe winters, and an invasion of grasshoppers reduced the prairie to an uninhabitable wasteland.

Inhe wrote and published the first sequel, The Marvelous Land of Ozexplaining that he grudgingly wrote the sequel to address the popular demand. We reply to them that changing conditions make new issues; that the principles upon which rest Democracy are as everlasting as the hills; but that they must be applied to new conditions as they arise.

Accordingly, the Lion attacks and kills the great beast by knocking off its head. The sympathies of the Democratic Party, as described by the platform, are on the side of the struggling masses, who have ever been the foundation of the Democratic Party.

Bywhen Bryan was again defeated by McKinley, Populism already had one foot in the political grave.

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The Bryan nomination created a split in the Democratic Party, as gold-standard delegates bolted the convention. It was not unconstitutional when it went before the Supreme Court for the first time. At the end of the story, the Scarecrow supplants the Wizard as the ruler of Emerald City, the Tin Woodman is made master of the West, and the Lion is placed over the animals of the forest.

Monetary policy[ edit ] In a article, [5] educator and historian Henry Littlefield outlined an allegory in the book of the late 19th-century debate regarding monetary policy.

Frank Baum's classic children's novel as an allegory of the Gilded Age political economy and a comment on the gold standard. The Wicked Witch of the West — western industrialists, bankers, and the railroads.

Its first edition had a printing of 10, copies and was sold in advance of the publication date of September 1, Toto chases a kitten in the crowd and Dorothy goes after him, but the tethers of the balloon break and the Wizard floats away.

His conduct on the journey through Oz is marked by common sense, resilience, and rectitude. Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Baum did not offer any conclusive proof that he intended his novel to be a political allegory.

The Tin Man representing the industrial workers, especially those of American steel industries The Cowardly Lion as a metaphor for William Jennings Bryan Taylor also claimed a sort of iconography for the cyclone: Although some of the parallels are more tenuous than others, many are so obvious and palpable as to defy coincidence.

Similarly, the Wizard made the people in the Emerald City wear green goggles so that they would believe that their city was built from emeralds. The book has a bright and joyous atmosphere, and does not dwell upon killing and deeds of violence.

In an ingenuous act of imaginative scholarship, Henry M.

Following the Yellow Brick Road: The Real Story Behind ‘The Wizard of Oz’

I stand with Jefferson rather than with them, and tell them, as he did, that the issue of money is a function of the government and that the banks should go out of the governing business.

From a washboiler he made a body, from bolted stovepipes he made arms and legs, and from the bottom of a saucepan he made a face. Breaking up the trusts and nationalizing the railroads were key components of the Populist agenda, and Bryan favored trust busting if not outright nationalization.

Baum himself used the monopoly-as-octopus metaphor in a number of later works, including a specific reference to the Standard Oil Company. This is only a sampling of some of the most obvious connections that have been identified between characters and situations in The Wizard of Oz and the real-life politics of its time.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. When Dorothy is taken to the Emerald Palace before her audience with the Wizard she is led through seven passages and up three flights of stairs, a subtle reference to the [ Coinage Act of ] which started the class conflict in America.

As a child, Baum frequently had nightmares of a scarecrow pursuing him across a field. Look at the Filipinos. President Grover Cleveland of NY was their pro-gold standard candidate.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Monetary Reformer’s Brief Symbol Glossary by Patrick S.J. Carmack, J.D. The following is a compilation of several views of the monetary reform symbolism used by L.

Frank Baum in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Who knew? "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" was a political allegory for early 20th century American politics.

L. Frank Baum wrote the children's fantasy book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in It was adapted into a Broadway musical by Baum inand then into its first movie adaption in after. The Historian's Wizard of Oz synthesizes four decades of scholarly interpretations of L.

Frank Baum's classic children's novel as an allegory of the Gilded Age political economy and a /5(11). The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum was the first fairytale written in United States. Baum wrote TheWonderful Wizard of Oz during a time in history that was The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L.

Frank Baum was the first fairytale written in United States. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (/ ɒ z /) is an American children's novel written by author L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Quotes

W. Denslow, originally published by the George M. Hill Company in Author: L. Frank Baum.

The allegory of the wizard of oz by frank baum
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