An analysis of the domestication of plants in michael pollans the botany of desire

Finally, Pollan uses the humble potato—and the development of the genetically modified Bt potato—as an example of our desire for control. Think about the notion of "unintended consequences" of the drug war in relation to marijuana. Seasoned garden writer Michael Pollan explores the histories of apples, tulips, potatoes, and marijuana, showing in the process how humanity and plants intersect and affect each other.

Why or why not. How are they similar or different. What if prices could be lowered significantly or calories per serving increased dramatically. Serious researchers, doing their jobs for decades, could not believe this assumption made in the book: It was there, more than 8, years ago, that the plant was first domesticated, and more than 5, different varieties of potatoes are still grown there today.

What are the similarities and differences. The bright line between food and poison might hold, but not the one between poison and desire. Michael Pollan has conceived a new and powerful understanding of who we are, and how we stand in relation to everything else—and the stories he tells to prove the point make the world seem a richer place.

Do botanical gardens really help to preserve plant species. Some of the scientific facts have been interpreted for the reader, and there may be differing opinions about these interpretations; however, the book is interesting and should appeal to general readers.

Michael Pollan

Using the histories of apples, tulips, potatoes and cannabis to illustrate the complex, reciprocal relationship between humans and the natural world, he shows how these species have successfully exploited human desires to flourish.

Yet these bitter apples were perfect for something — the making of alcoholic, or "hard" cider, a potent libation that became the drink of choice for everyone from paupers to presidents.

One comment in the book made me sit up straight. Apple trees grown from seeds tend to be biologically very diverse, and most of the fruit those trees will bear will taste bitter rather than sweet.

The desire for sweetness is hardwired in human beings. But by the late 19th century, drunkenness was on the rise, and an outcry, led by the hatchet-wielding prohibitionist Carrie Nation, arose against the evil apple.

Apparently when Africans speak or write about flowers, it is usually with an eye to the promise of fruit rather than the thing itself. How plants manipulate us, as well as animals and insects are riveting reading for sure. What flowers one does encounter on the savanna, for example, tend to bloom briefly and then vanish for the duration of the dry season.

The Botany of Desire

What is in it for them. Today, given the proliferation of artificially sweetened products available to us, does our evolution betray us or have we betrayed our evolution.

The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World

Pollan's clear, elegant style enlivens even his most scientific material, and his wide-ranging references and charming manner do much to support his basic contention that man and nature are and will always be "in this boat together.

The Botany of Desire Quotes (showing of 52) “For it is only by forgetting that we ever really drop the thread of time and approach the experience of living in.

In The Botany of Desire, Pollan makes a persuasive case that the plants we might be tempted to see as having been most domesticated by humanity are in fact also those that have been most effective in domesticating us. It is a stunning insight, and no one will come away from this book without having their ideas of nature stretched and challenged.”.

The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World is a nonfiction book by journalist Michael michaelferrisjr.com presents case studies that mirror four types of human desires that are reflected in the way that we selectively grow, breed, and genetically engineer our michaelferrisjr.com tulip, beauty; marijuana, intoxication; the apple, sweetness;.

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship.

The Botany of Desire Summary

He master The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan introduces the possibility to the reader that plants are using insects, animals and humans to ensure /5. The Botany of Desire – Michael Pollan – PBS () Domestication is a defining feature of recent human evolution. In animals first trait selected by humans was behavior.

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship.

He masterfully links four fundamental human desires—sweetness, beauty, intoxication, and control—with the plants that satisfy them: the apple, the tulip, marijuana, and the potato.

An analysis of the domestication of plants in michael pollans the botany of desire
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The Botany of Desire: Based on the book by Michael Pollan: Lesson Plan - Control: Far Afield | PBS